It’s Easy Being Green at Lathrop

by Barbara Walvoord

(Originally printed in Lathrop Lamp Post May 27 – Jun 2, 2017)

If you walk along the edges of one of our Lathrop streams or ponds these days, frogs may plop into the water at your approach. You may hear the “jug-a-rum” of the American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianos) or the “gunk” of the green frog (Lithobates clamatans), like this one found by several residents who were pulling invasive plants near the east campus Teaberry pond.

You can tell our frog is a green frog by its greenish color and by the ridges that run down each side of its back. You can tell our Teaberry frog is a male because its tympanum or eardrum, located just behind the eye, is larger than the eye. At this time of the year, our male is probably defending the pond as his territory.  He mates between April and August, clasping his lady love from behind, and fertilizing her thousands of eggs as she lays them in the pond water.

Continue reading It’s Easy Being Green at Lathrop

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Careful! Don’t Hit a Turtle on our Road

by Barbara Walvoord

( Originally printed in Lathrop Lamp Post,  June 2-9, 2017)

Last spring, Sharon and I found a painted turtle on the road at Mulberry Lane.  Last week we found another one at about the same spot. Last year’s turtle was dead, its shell smashed by a car. This year’s turtle was alive, working its legs rhythmically, hauling its protective shell purposefully across the road.  It knew where it wanted to go, and we had built a road in its way.

Undoubtedly, our turtle has come from a slow moving stream or a pond.  During the winter, it burrowed into the mud at the bottom, or found a muskrat burrow.   While dormant, its body reduced the need for oxygen, so it could “breathe” through its skin, throat lining, and thin-walled sacs near its anus.  Emerging in spring, our turtle stayed near water.  After a graceful courtship dance, in which the male swam around the female, as they stroked each other gently with their legs, the couple sank to the bottom of the pond for underwater mating. Continue reading Careful! Don’t Hit a Turtle on our Road

The Bird that Stayed

by Barbara Walvoord

(Originally published in the Lathrop Lamp Post, May 20-26, 2017)

Sometimes on a bird walk, with bird songs all around, and lots of  little flying shapes flitting through the trees, your leader stops, cocks her head to listen, then points into the woods, and says, “blue-winged warbler” or “Red-eyed vireo.”  Everyone raises their binoculars, and the lucky person who actually spots the bird says, “See that first little pine tree? Look to the left of it, the third tree down, just to the right of that dead tree?  The vireo is on a branch at about 11 o’clock, about half way up.”  And you raise your binoculars, crane your neck, and then, just as you’ve found the tree, your spotter says, “Oops, it flew.”

On the north campus bird walk May 9, a pileated woodpecker took pity on us.  It was hammering hard on a tree, trying to find the carpenter ants that are its main food.  When we came along, it just kept hammering, right in plain sight, even as we all inched closer, and Lucy raised her long zoom lens and followed it around the tree to get some fabulous photos. Continue reading The Bird that Stayed

A Pond is a Pond: Herons at Lathrop

by Barbara Walvoord

(Originally published in the Lathrop Lamp Post of May 13-19, 2017)

Last week, our group of bird walkers startled up a green heron on the east campus Teaberry pond. It flew into a nearby tree.  A few days later I saw a pair of them there, so maybe we have a heron family.

Our herons have flown here from perhaps as far south as Panama.  They  like small freshwater ponds surrounding by trees where they can nest.  Our Teaberry pond is a human-made retention basin that receives run-off from our streets and roofs, and holds it before sending it through a pipe into the adjacent wetland. The pond has a rubber liner, but there must be quite a layer of mud on the bottom because the pond is full of native cattails, and we see lots of frogs, toads, snakes, insects, and salamanders there–good food for herons, who stand motionless along the banks or on fallen logs and pounce on their prey. Continue reading A Pond is a Pond: Herons at Lathrop